February 25, 2021

Dental FAQ

It’s not uncommon for those who don’t spend their day immersed in the dental world to have questions about the field. It’s normal to be curious and we definitely encourage patients to ask questions that will help keep them informed about how they can help ensure a healthy mouth for themselves and their families. We’ve highlighted some of the most frequently asked questions we hear from patients. Is an electric toothbrush better than a manual toothbrush? Both electric and manual toothbrushes will clean your teeth. The best way to ensure a good clean is by taking your time - you should be brushing for 2-3 minutes. Take this time to clean all of the surfaces in your mouth thoroughly. Patients may find that manual toothbrushes that have varying bristle heights help to loosen plaque are more effective, but we recommend choosing the brush that works best for you. It is important to make sure that you’re choosing the correct brush strength and using the right pressure to ensure you don’t cause damage to your gums. What type of toothpaste should I use? Most toothpastes on the market are going to clean your teeth. They’ll help rid your mouth of bacteria...
February 11, 2021

What is Tooth Decay

Tooth decay, more commonly referred to as cavities, are one of the most common dental problems in the world today – especially in children. Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface or enamel of your teeth. If left untreated cavities can become larger in size and eventually they will begin to affect deeper layers of the tooth. What Are the Symptoms of Tooth Decay It’s not uncommon for patients who are dealing with cavities to experience zero symptoms prior to diagnosis by a dentist. However, warning signs of this particular dental issue might present in the following ways: Tooth pain Tooth sensitivity Pain when you bite down or brush Visible holes or pits in your teeth What Causes Tooth Decay Tooth decay is a process that occurs over time. Unlike a chipped or cracked tooth, the route to a cavity can take several months or years. The decay is caused when plaque, a clear sticky film, forms on the tooth. Plaque occurs when sugars and starches from things that we eat and drink aren’t properly cleaned off the teeth. (https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/health-info/tooth-decay/more-info/tooth-decay-process) Over time, the acids in the plaque will begin to attack the tooth, eating away at the hard,...