It’s the beginning of a new year, and if you’re like a majority of the world then the new year is a great time to recommit or at least stay committed to staying healthy. As we try to emphasize to our patients, maintaining good oral health plays a key role in your overall health journey. The mouth is the portal into the rest of your body and because of this it’s important that you work in regular dental cleanings to ensure that you have a healthy mouth. If you’ve recently moved, haven’t been to the dentist in a while or are simply looking for someone new to see, we have a few tips that might help you. How to Find a Dentist There are lots of ways that you can find a dentist. If you’ve recently moved you could start by asking your previous dentist for a recommendation. They might know someone in your new location or might have some suggestions on a good place to start looking. Ask your friends for a recommendation. It’s likely that you and your friends have things in common and you trust their advice – that’s why you are friends isn’t it? Get information...
Your oral health is important; it might be more important than you even realize. It’s probable that you’ve heard the expression “the eyes are the window to the soul.” While it might be slightly (or a lot) cheesy, there’s also a level of truth to it which is likely why it’s such a popular phrase. Similarly, in the dental world we like to say that “the mouth is the gateway to your gut.” While this one is pretty obvious, what you might not realize is just how your oral health can impact your overall physical health. What’s the Connection? There has long been an indication that a connection exists between overall health and oral health. Dentists, simply by looking at your teeth, can sometimes identify warning signs of underlying health problem. Similarly, primary care doctors know that various health issues like diabetes can impact oral health, and therefore can help create awareness for patients. Connected Health Issues The mouth, which has a variety of bacteria, is also the entry point for both your respiratory and digestive tracts. While most of the bacteria in your mouth is harmless, there remains a connection between the bacteria, the inflammation those bacteria cause, and...